Does online rehab really work?

Does online rehab really work?

 

The ongoing stress and uncertainty of COVID-19 has led to an increased demand for mental health services in Canada. While we often think of mental health issues like anxiety and depression as the predominant conditions people are challenged by at this time, we are also facing a public health crisis with increasing opioid, alcohol and stimulant addictions. More than ever, people need varied and accessible treatment options to recover from addictions.

One form of service filling this need is virtual or online treatment. Online programs make recovery more affordable and accessible – but are they effective in treating addiction?

What makes rehab effective?

Within the different types of treatment options that exist, there are common factors that make a rehab program effective. An effective rehabilitation program will focus not only on the individual’s substance use, but also on coping strategies, interpersonal relationships, and other important areas of functioning.1 While the definition of success may vary from one program to another, effective treatment should always include a few common results.

A person receiving effective addiction treatment should demonstrate some of the following:

  • Reduced amount and frequency of substance use, including longer gaps between relapses
  • Improved employment or education status and attendance
  • Improved physical health, indicated by fewer medical visits
  • Improved mental health, indicated by improved mood, personality traits and behaviors
  • Improved relationships with friends, family, and others2

A good program should ultimately help you reach and maintain sobriety, using the coping skills you develop while in treatment. As a result, other areas of your life should also improve.

Differences and similarities between virtual and in person

Some elements of in person and virtual rehab are very similar while others can be slightly different. Both are highlighted below.

Differences

Accessibility

One of the main differences between the two are accessibility. With an online program, you can seek help no matter where you or the program are based. With convenience and location removed from the equation, you can focus on the program and specialities best suited to your individual needs. You also don’t have to worry about factors like weather or access to transportation.

Travel and Time Commitment

Because there is no travel time for online addiction treatment, another thing that differs is your time commitment. You no longer need to factor in the time it takes to commute to and from your program. It is also worth noting that online programs may be very structured, but they also give you the freedom to recover from home while you continue to work or tend to family commitments.

Perceived Vulnerability

As with any recovery program, there is always a perceived vulnerability involved in trying something new and for some, anonymity can be an important aspect of a program. Because you can participate on a virtual platform further away from your home, there is less chance of running into someone in your program you know, which can provide a sense of greater freedom to be vulnerable. You also don’t run the risk of seeing someone you know in a parking lot or near the location of your program, which can remove a lot of anxiety involved in seeking and getting help.

Affordability

It is also worth noting that there can be a difference in cost. Because you are not living in a facility, online programs are not as costly as in-person rehab. In addition, you don’t have to worry about expenses like childcare or gas, as you are recovering from home.

Similarities

Personal Connections

Like in person rehab, virtual programs allow you to make personal connections with those in your program. Not only can you connect with the professional leading the program, but there is also the opportunity to connect with peers as you would in person. Group sessions and shared experiences, whether online or in person, have therapeutic benefits and encourage the creation of emotional connections with others.

Crisis Response

Both types of programs also offer interventions in case of an emergency. Those trained to run in person and online sessions know how to spot someone in crisis by reading their facial expressions and physical cues. Many programs also offer apps, where a person can self-report if they need immediate assistance.

Efficacy

For people experiencing mild-to-moderate addiction symptoms, online treatment can be equally, if not more, effective than in-person rehab. With the right program, you can meet all the “efficacy qualifications” listed above, with the added benefit of being able to practice and encourage the skills and coping mechanisms you are learning in real time. One area of your life where you can practice this is in your relationships. When you are doing the work from home, you have the opportunity to discuss and repair relations with your family and friends.

Proven benefits of online rehab

Online rehab offers many benefits, especially for someone with mild to moderate addiction issues. As mentioned above, virtual programs are often more accessible, especially for those who live in remote areas and would not have help close by otherwise.

While it would be great if everyone could occasionally take a break from their everyday lives to work on their wellness, for many, that is simply not possible. Online programs allow you to continue to live at home and go to work if you need to.

When your life has not been uprooted, you can recover without worrying about how much time you are away from home for, what it is you might be missing, or how soon you have to re-enter your day-to-day routine. It also helps you to recover without removing some of the stressors in your daily life, which gives you the opportunity to apply new coping skills in real-time, something you might not necessarily get to practice in a residential treatment program.

There is evidence that shows that those with social anxiety often do better in online settings as they are less concerned about encountering others face-to-face.3 This can make it easier to open up and express the challenges you are facing.

It is worth noting that even though they are online, these programs are structured. They have set times and specific activities or exercises that are designed to keep you on track and give you better support overall.

How EHN Online’s program sets you up for sobriety

EHN Online’s addiction recovery program has several benefits to help set participants up for success. The Substance Use Disorder Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is structured to provide an eight-week intensive rehabilitation course that provides a wide variety of education and skills to help participants regain control over their cravings, habits, and lives. Each week will include nine hours of treatment time composed of individual and group therapy, as well as psychoeducation about substance addiction and skill building.

Following the eight weeks of intensive care, participants have access to 10 months of aftercare, keeping up with progress tracking on the Wagon app, and meeting with a group once per week. This will encourage maintenance of positive habits and beneficial skills, while continuing the opportunity to build a strong support network of individuals with similar experiences and hardships.

If your loved ones are looking for better ways to support you, EHN’s IOP also offers a Family program as part of the package, so that loved ones can also receive advice and access better tools to aid in long-term recovery.

EHN Online’s substance use disorder program provides all the benefits of virtual rehab, such as accessibility and structure, while also making treatment affordable and providing the chance to work on challenges, skills and relationships in real time.

Most importantly, EHN Online’s virtual program is one that works. While there is no one “right” way to receive treatment, as the effectiveness of each setting and treatment approach is dependent on you and your unique situation, online rehab can be a sustainable and helpful option to consider.

How to access an online rehab program

If you have mild to moderate addition symptoms and believe online rehab may suit your needs, then don’t hesitate to call us. Our consultations are free and there are no wait times for enrolment. Book an assessment and see if this program is right for you.

It is always a good time to get started, so give us a call today!

 

Ready to begin a rehab program with proven results? Sign up for an online Intensive Outpatient Program today.

 

 

References

  1. Administration (US), S. A. and M. H. S., & General (US), O. of the S. (2016). Early Intervention, Treatment, and Management of Substance Use Disorders. Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. US Department of Health and Human Services. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK424859/
  2. May 28, E. S. L. U. & 2021. (n.d.). How to Find Effective Drug Rehab Programs? How to Evaluate American Addiction Centers. Retrieved September 6, 2021, from https://americanaddictioncenters.org/rehab-guide/effective
  3. McCall, H. C., Helgadottir, F. D., Menzies, R. G., Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., & Chen, F. S. (2019). Evaluating a Web-Based Social Anxiety Intervention Among Community Users: Analysis of Real-World Data. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 21(1), e11566. https://doi.org/10.2196/11566

When to get help for mental health disorders and addiction — and where to find it

When to get help for mental health disorders and addiction — and where to find it

When we think of mental health challenges and addiction issues, we probably think of extremes. Sober or alcoholic. Healthy or not. Panic attacks where you’re bed-bound for days. Liver problems from excessive drinking.

You might start asking yourself questions like ‘Do I need help, or will this go away eventually?’ This article is designed to help you find the answer. Now, when it comes to struggling with addiction, depression or anxiety, there’s no substitute for being diagnosed and treated by a qualified medical professional. However, this article will give you some insight into where you or a loved one’s symptoms might fall within the range of mental health and addiction conditions, when you should start thinking about getting help, and what your options are.

 

Canada’s growing mental health and addiction crisis

 

Let’s begin with a little background. “Mental illness” and “addiction” can apply to a wide range of disorders that may affect how you think, your mood, and the way you behave. When we talk about these disorders, we are generally referring to depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. While many people will struggle with varying degrees of these disorders, they become more and more worrying as they begin to get more frequent and/or harder to resist.

These disorders are incredibly common and affect people of all ages and lifestyles. In fact, every year, at least one in five Canadians experiences a mental health condition. The Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) points out:

  • About 8% of adults will experience major depression at some time in their lives
  • will have or have had a mental illness
  • Anxiety disorders affect 5% of the household population, causing mild to severe impairment
  • Substance use disorders affect approximately 6% of Canadians.

CMHA also states that 21% of the population (six million people or so) will meet the criteria for addiction in their lifetime. Alcohol and cannabis are the substances that most commonly meet the criteria for addiction, but opioid use has also become a crisis.

 

Mental health, depression, and COVID-19

If Canada had a mental illness and addiction problem before, it was kicked into overdrive by the COVID-19 pandemic.

In its “Survey on COVID-19 and Mental Health,” the federal government revealed that 21% of adults aged 18 and older screened positive for at least one of three mental disorders: major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The survey also said that mental disorders were four times higher among adults who were isolated by the pandemic, and 40% of Canadians who had financial troubles because of COVID-19 screened positive for one of three mental disorders.

“Since the beginning of COVID-19, we have been seeing some very troubling trends in mental health and addiction,” said Lanie Schachter-Snipper, the National Director of Outpatient Services at EHN Canada, in an interview with Georgia Straight.

“There are increased rates of addiction, overdoses, and addiction-related deaths, as well as an increase in rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide. Those who never or rarely experienced mental health issues pre-pandemic are reporting new issues emerging and those who had preexisting conditions are reporting the worsening of symptoms.”

 

How depression and anxiety affect your mental wellbeing

For some people, mood and anxiety disorders can hinder their ability to successfully manage life’s ups and downs. For others, mood and anxiety disorders prevent them from living life at all, creating such severe anxiety they can’t leave their house, work their jobs, or enjoy time with family. These disorders can make life incredibly difficult, leaving people feeling lost, isolated, and hopeless.

Depression can cause an unshakeable feeling of sadness, leaving people unable to engage in everyday activities — even enjoyable ones. People affected by depression, especially major clinical depression, can’t “just snap out of it,” and may require treatment, including psychotherapy, medication, or both.

Other mood disorders include bipolar disorder, dysthymia, and disorders related to health conditions and substance use.

Anxiety disorders often come with excessive and persistent feelings of stress, anxiety, and fear. Of course, occasional anxiety is a part of life, but anxiety disorders leave people with intense and excessive worries and fears about everyday situations. People may suffer from debilitating panic or anxiety attacks, forcing them to retreat and start avoiding places or situations that might trigger an attack.

When you couple these existing mood and anxiety disorders with the pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic (such as isolation, fear about an uncertain future, and concerns about economic hardships), it’s no wonder that many people found their symptoms becoming even more pervasive.

 

When is it time for depression and/or anxiety therapy?

Many people wonder if their symptoms are normal, or if they might require some kind of treatment. The truth is that symptoms can range from minimal, to mild, to moderate, to severe. Where you fall on this range will determine whether you need to seek treatment, and also impacts what kind of treatment will be right for you.

At to identify where symptoms fall in the minimal to severe range. We encourage you to use these questions to help determine whether you or a loved one might be ready to seek help.

  • How you feel inside: Do you find little interest or pleasure in doing things? Do you feel down, depressed or hopeless? Do you feel bad about yourself — that you are a failure or that you have let your family down? Have you thought that you would be better off dead, or about hurting yourself in some way?
  • Physical effects: Have you felt tired or had little energy? Have you had trouble with insomnia or sleeping too much? Has your appetite been poor, or have you been overeating?
  • Behaviours or interactions with others changing: Have you had trouble concentrating on things like reading, work or watching TV? Have people noticed that you moved or spoke slowly? Or the opposite — that you’ve been fidgety or restless?

 

To identify where you fall within the range of anxiety symptoms, the EHN Online team looks for:

  • How you feel inside: Do you feel anxious, worried or nervous? Do you have moments of sudden terror, fear or fright? Have you had thoughts of bad things happening, such as family tragedy, ill-health, job loss or accidents?
  • Physical effects: Have you felt your heart racing, sweaty, trouble breathing, faint or shaky? Have you felt tense muscles, jaw clenching or teeth grinding, on edge or restless, or had trouble relaxing or sleeping?
  • Behaviours or interactions with others changing: Have you avoided situations that you’re worried about? Have you left situations or participated only minimally due to worries? Have you spent lots of time making decisions, putting off making decisions or preparing for situations?

 

Alcohol and drugs: how much is too much?

Substance use disorder affects a person’s brain and behaviour and can lead to uncontrolled use of a drug or medication, even when the person knows these substances are causing them harm. It’s important to remember that the legality or illegality of a substance doesn’t play a role in diagnosing substance use disorder, which is why alcohol, cannabis and nicotine can all become problematic.

Substance use disorder can sometimes begin by experimenting with alcohol or drugs recreationally, ‘just for fun,’ but getting drawn deeper and deeper into a complete dependency. In other cases, addiction can start with prescribed medications like opioids. In both cases, users will quickly notice they need more and more to achieve the desired effect, despite the physical, emotional, or financial toll it takes on them and the people they love.

While there are many possible different symptoms of substance use disorder, some signs to look for include:

  • Overwhelming urges to consume the substance
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms if you stop consuming
  • Needing more of the substance to get the same effect
  • Spending money on the substance, even if you can’t afford it

Deep down, people often know their substance use is getting out of hand, but that’s a terrifying thing to admit to yourself and others. It takes honesty and immense bravery to admit you need help and to reach out for it, and people who do so require support from trained professionals and caring peers, friends, or family to reclaim their lives and start truly living again.

 

From self-rehabilitation to intensive outpatient programs: which is right for you?

When determining substance abuse and addiction issues, the EHN Online Team looks for the following. We encourage you to use these questions to help determine whether you or a loved one might be struggling.

  • How much do you consume and how do you consume it? Do you drink or take drugs in a particular way to increase the effect? Do you consume in the morning, afternoon and evening?
  • How do substances fit in with the rest of your day? Have you found yourself thinking about when you will next be able to have another drink or take drugs? Have you identified substance use as more important than anything else you might do during the day? Have you felt that your need for drink or drugs was too strong to control? Have you planned your day around getting/taking alcohol or drugs? Have you found it difficult to cope with life without drink or drugs?

 

A closer look at the range of addiction and mental health conditions

We’ve used the answers to our screening questions to create the infographic below. Use your answers to find where exactly you fall in the range of addiction and mental health conditions.

Download the full infographic here.

Minimal: Everyone should take care of their physical and mental wellbeing

If you look at the infographic and determine that you identify as “not using” on the addiction spectrum, and “healthy” on the mental health spectrum, that’s great news. You don’t need to seek professional help for these.

But mental health is like physical health — the more you maintain it, the better you’ll feel. Consider using online apps designed to support good mental health habits and check out free online mental health and addiction communities like the forums from the Mood Disorders Society of Canada.

 

Mild to moderate: try early intervention

If you found yourself in the mild-to-moderate section of the infographic, there are a few ways you can find help.

For mild-to-moderate use of drugs and alcohol, you may still be at the experimental stage. Perhaps you’re feeling peer pressure or find yourself turning to them a little too often. You might be able to stop using the drugs on your own initiative at this stage. Perhaps reach out to a close friend or trusted family member with whom you can be honest. Ask for their support and to hold you accountable as you begin cutting these substances out.

But what if your use becomes more habitual, if you’re consuming substances regularly and increasing doses to get the same effect, and you find yourself having trouble controlling your urge to use them?

 

If early intervention is not enough, it’s time for structured help

Structured help can come in the form of an intensive outpatient program, an industry term for a program made up of individual, group, or family therapy sessions, support groups, medications, and behavioural therapy conducted by a licensed addictions or mental health therapist.

The challenge is sometimes these types of intensive outpatient programs can be hard to come by. The treatment facilities only have limited spaces available or can be too far for people to get to.

This is where EHN Online’s Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) services come in. With EHN Online, geography doesn’t matter. You get the support you need for your mild-to-moderate symptoms at home, helping you change your path with the guidance of credentialled, caring staff. You get virtual mental health and addiction solutions, delivered by the professionals at EHN Canada, who have more than 75 years of experience successfully treating mental health and addiction issues.

The different online therapy programs include nine hours of group and individual therapy sessions for eight weeks, followed by 10 months of aftercare support. The programs also come with access to EHN’s online platform and app, Wagon, which gives you a personalized recovery plan, as well as different tools, exercises, and ways to record your progress as you achieve your wellness goals.

 

Not sure if online therapy is for you?

It might be the right fit if…

  • You are having increasing trouble functioning at work
  • You have symptoms triggered by specific events or situations
  • Your levels of depression, anxiety or stress are increasing
  • You are relying more on substances to cope with daily life challenges
  • You would like to reevaluate your coping skills to maintain your recovery
  • Your current coping strategies aren’t working

 

Severe symptoms: consider inpatient care

If the infographic places you on the far end of the range, you are grappling with the most serious symptoms and possible harms. You may be at risk for a full-blown mental health crisis, with outbursts of anger, excessive panic attacks, thoughts of suicide, constant fatigue, and falling prey to different addictions.

With symptoms as severe as these, you will require inpatient care with a stay at a professional mental illness and addiction treatment facility for your safety.

This may be unwelcome news, or perhaps you’ve known you needed help for a long time. Either way, you will soon be getting the help you need to take back control of the life that has been stolen from you by addiction or mental health issues. Inpatient care doesn’t just treat immediate issues — such as detoxing — but it will also help you identify and address underlying problems that cause your symptoms, teaching you better ways to cope. With the right help, you can avoid rock bottom, and begin your climb toward a healthy future.

 

A general guide, not a diagnosis

The information about where you may lie on the range of mental health or addiction issues is only offered as a general guide. To get an accurate diagnosis, you need to consult an experienced professional.

EHN Online makes the process of getting the qualified help you need easy. You can simply book a free consultation online, or do so by telephone or email. After the consultation, you can pick the program best suited to your needs.

Then you can start on the road to recovery, supported by EHN Online, a recognized leader in addiction and related mental health services. Wherever your symptoms fall, we can help you find a new and better place to thrive.

 

Begin the journey towards recovery today.

 

How much does online therapy cost?

How much does online therapy cost?

Online therapy is an excellent and convenient way to access mental health support. Even though it may seem that online therapy is a relatively new development, virtual therapy has existed in many forms for years. Over the past year and a half, with the COVID-19 pandemic, online therapy has grown even more popular, with most therapists and programs switching from in-person to an online format. Upon making the switch, many therapists, and their clients, found that online therapy offered several benefits. Aside from being more accessible, online therapy can also be a more affordable option than in-person treatment. If you are considering therapy, learning about the costs of online options can be a great start.

 

What is Online Therapy?

Individual Therapy

Online therapy can take many different forms. Traditionally, when we think of therapy, the image that comes to mind is one of individual counselling, where a therapist talks to a single patient, face-to-face in an office setting. Individual counselling is a popular and proven form of therapy that can, fortunately, be replicated quite easily over the phone through a secure online platform.

Through teletherapy or video therapy, you will meet with a therapist on a call or video call and talk to them for a set amount of time. The platform your therapist chooses will be both secure and private. You can work through any issues you are having and learn coping mechanisms just as you would in person.

While an in-person session can typically run anywhere from $100-200 per appointment, there may be a slight decrease in cost if this session takes place virtually. This can be due to fewer operating costs for the therapists or if your individual

In a treatment plan like this, you may do online counselling in both a group and individual setting for a set period of weeks, as well as have other accountability tools at your disposal like an app and continued access to clinicians. Because it is , the cost breakdown works out to less than if you were to seek out all the elements of the program individually. For example, the cost of a one-hour individual counselling session becomes less than as part of an IOP, while a single session with an independent therapist might run around $150 per hour.

 

Group Therapy

Online group therapy is a form of psychotherapy in which one or two therapists work with several clients at the same time. Therapy groups typically have up to 12 members and meet for one or more hours, weekly. The therapists guide the group process and provide structure. Groups may be open or closed. In an open group, members may join at any time, while a closed group has a set start and end date (like in an IOP).

Often, community support can take the form of group therapy. Online community support is often less expensive or free to use but may not provide the amount of guidance or support on its own that you need to fully recover.

 

Text Therapy

With advances in technology, teletherapy now extends to texting as well. Text therapy services generally operate through a platform that will match you with a therapist who can offer the kind of support you need. Once you have a therapist, you can start sending messages detailing what you want to work through. Text therapy is often priced at a monthly rate and can be much cheaper.

It is also important to keep in mind that even if the cost of the service is the same price online, you might be saving in other ways. Consider and factor in your travel costs or what you might save in childcare if you are doing therapy from home.

 

Is Online Therapy Worth It?

The short answer is yes. While internet-based therapy might seem like a rather new offering, as mentioned above, it’s been around for quite some time and improvements in technology have only made the practice more secure, easier to navigate, and optimal. There is already strong evidence that online therapy is as effective as in-person treatment. A trial in the Journal of Effective Disorders found that “internet-based intervention for depression is equally beneficial to regular face-to-face therapy. However, more long-term efficacy, indicated by continued symptom reduction three months after treatment, could only be found for the online group.”1 In another meta-review of apps for anxiety and depression, researchers found that apps “hold great promise with clear clinical advantages, either as stand-alone self-management or as adjunctive treatments.”2

You may also find that online therapy works best for your lifestyle. It provides access to services you may not otherwise have in your local area and allows you to work on yourself from the comfort of your home. For those who deal with social anxiety, online therapy has been found to be “effective for reducing the symptoms of social anxiety disorder” without the triggering symptoms of face-to-face, which may lead some to avoid or quit treatment.3 Increasingly, smartphone-based options, like apps, are being taken up by organizations like universities to support student mental health.

With a rise in mental health related issues this past year, online and teletherapy helped to increase the capacity for care and aided many individuals to stay on track and continue to make progress with their therapeutic goals.

 

Do Insurance Providers Cover Online Therapy?

While many insurance providers do cover some forms of online therapy, it is always best to check with your provider directly to ensure you know what is included in your plan. Often, whether you are covered or not depends on the credentials of the therapist. Make sure to check with the therapist or program you are interested in to confirm what they are certified in so you can give your insurance provider as much information as possible before investing in a service.

If your insurance providers do not provide coverage, investigate charities that run programs or will help you to fund your therapy. There is more support out there than you might imagine.

 

How Much Should You Expect to Pay for an Online Therapy Program?

The most important thing to keep in mind when considering cost is to think about what is going to be most effective for you. While some services may cost less, they may not be what you need to recover. Going for the cheaper option, instead of the right option, will not only lead to delayed recovery, but money and time wasted.

Something like an IOP may seem like a larger investment, but when you break down the services and amount of hours you are getting, the value for the cost is greater than the average price of a therapy session or standalone text service. It is useful to always consider the cost against the amount and quality of service.

The cost of EHN Online’s IOP works out to $38/hr for 173 hours of treatment at a bundled price. If you were to choose everything the program offers in a self-directed manner, you would end up paying almost twice the price. Therefore, an IOP may be the best option.

All in all, online therapy is a great way to get help for less money and easier accessibility. Prices range, but there are options like insurance and charities that can help. No matter which option, or combination of options you choose, the aims remain the same. Online therapy, like in person therapy, is there to help you relieve distress through discussing and expressing feelings; helping to change attitudes and habits that may be unhelpful, and promoting more constructive ways of coping.

 

Struggling with mental health or addiction? Sign up for an online Intensive Outpatient Program today.

 

References

  1. Lecomte, T., Potvin, S., Corbière, M., Guay, S., Samson, C., Cloutier, B., Francoeur, A., Pennou, A., & Khazaal, Y. (2020). Mobile Apps for Mental Health Issues: Meta-Review of Meta-Analyses. JMIR MHealth and UHealth, 8(5), e17458. https://doi.org/10.2196/17458
  2. “Internet-based versus face-to-face cognitive-behavioral intervention for depression: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.” Journal of Affective Disorders, Volumes 152–154, January 2014, Pages 113-121. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0165032713005120?via%3Dihub
  3. McCall HC, Helgadottir FD, Menzies RG, Hadjistavropoulos HD, Chen FS. Evaluating a Web-Based Social Anxiety Intervention Among Community Users: Analysis of Real-World Data. J Med Internet Res. 2019;21(1):e11566. doi:10.2196/11566

Does online counselling work for depression?

Does online counselling work for depression?

Man-thinking

It is estimated that 1 in 3 Canadians will be affected by a mental illness during their lifetime.1 With mental health conditions like depression on the rise in Canada,2 access to treatment and care are more important than ever. Therapy has long been studied and proven as a positive treatment for many mental illnesses, but online or virtual treatment is a relatively newer endeavour. While teletherapy has existed for over twenty years,13 interest in virtual treatment for mental health concerns grew significantly in 2020 when most in person services had to quickly switch to virtual due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This switch increased both the study of and interest surrounding online counselling for conditions like depression and anxiety. Research shows that both modes of delivery are effective and there may even be some lifestyle benefits to online treatment.

What makes therapy effective?

To decide whether online treatment may be the right choice for you, it helps to understand what therapy is and what makes therapy effective. In psychotherapy, professionals apply scientifically validated procedures to help people develop healthier, more effective habits. There are several approaches to therapy—including cognitive behavioural (CBT), interpersonal, and other kinds of talk therapy—that help individuals work through their problems.3 Psychotherapy offers people the opportunity to identify the factors that contribute to their mental conditions and to deal effectively with the causes. Skilled therapists work with individuals so they can identify negative thought patterns, pinpoint and solve certain life problems, and regain a sense of control and pleasure in life.4

Effective therapy can be determined by several factors. Broadly speaking, a person may notice a reduction in their symptoms, an increase in overall happiness, more energy, and better self-worth. 5,6

Differences and similarities between virtual and in person therapy

All of the above outcomes can be achieved whether someone chooses to seek therapy in person or online. When thinking about which option is right for you, consider how the two modes are similar and how they differ.

Keep in mind is that both are effective for treating a mental disorder. A 2014 study found that online treatment was just as effective as face-to-face treatment for depression,7 while a 2018 study found that online CBT was equally as effective as face-to-face treatment for major depression, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder.8

Reading body language

Both in person and online treatment also offer the opportunity to make a personal connection with your counsellor and have one-on-one time with them for a personal assessment and to identify any potential concerns. Therapists that operate virtually are often trained to pick up on social and body language cues even in a virtual session and can take similar, if not the same, steps to intervene in a crisis. Before selecting a virtual therapist, you can inquire about their online training and how crises are addressed to ensure that you are satisfied with their approach.

Location and time

The largest difference between the delivery of in person and online therapy is the logistics surrounding sessions, such as time and place. While virtual treatment can be done from your own home and requires no commute time, in person therapy involves travelling to and from a therapist’s office.

Because virtual treatment takes place remotely, your location does not matter. With face-to-face treatment, the therapist must be in a vicinity close to you and your choices are limited to those that practice in your area. When geographical location is eliminated from the mix, more specialized treatment can often be found online with a larger pool of services to choose from.

Cost of treatment

Cost is another thing that might differ between in person and virtual. While some therapists may charge the same for online and in person sessions, certain virtual programs may be more cost-effective, where the price breakdown per hour comes out to less than a typical session.

Anonymity and privacy

You may also want to consider the varying levels of anonymity that come with programs. With in-person, there is always the chance of running into someone you recognize in a waiting room or in front of the therapist’s office, particularly if you live in a small town. In virtual programs, there may be a group session where other participants are involved. As with many programs that deal with private subject matter, measures are taken to ensure a level of privacy. These measures are another thing to consider when inquiring about programs that may include a group component.

Privacy and confidentiality are among common concerns for those who consider online treatment programs. Despite popular belief, online therapy can be equally as confidential as in person therapy. If you are feeling unsure about your privacy, inquire about whether your service is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). In short, this act works to protect the confidentiality of people receiving medical treatment, including mental health services.

Suitability

Lastly, consider what option is truly right for your condition and symptoms. Some individuals may not be suitable for online therapy. Individuals with severe mental health disorders such as schizophrenia, intellectual disabilities, or high suicidality may not be a good fit for some online therapy services.9 On the other hand, those with severe social anxiety might benefit from testing the waters of socialization through virtual group meetings where the perceived risks are much lower.

Proven benefits of online counselling

Flexibility

There are several benefits to online therapy. For many people, being able to partake in therapy from their own home saves them the time it takes to commute to and from treatment. It also allows for greater flexibility if the person cannot leave the house to attend a session. Those with younger children, for example, can attend a virtual session from their own home without having to arrange childcare.

Accessibility

A virtual program is also ideal for those with less accessibility to individual counsellors, such as those who live in smaller towns or remote areas. In these cases, online therapy works well as distance is no longer an issue. This also allows people to access a particular kind of service or therapeutic program that might not be offered anywhere physically near to them.

Less intimidation, more connections

Online group programs create a safe space for participants to open up to one another, which increases the number of opportunities to access peer support and make connections. Online therapy also encourages the disinhibition effect. Knowing you can close your laptop, are in a safe space, and that your support system may be close by allows people to feel more relaxed and comfortable to share their experiences. This is especially true for those who deal with social anxiety. Not having to leave the house and being able to attend treatment from a safe space makes getting help less intimidating.

 

While online therapy does not have the century of research behind it that in person therapy does, several studies and research in the last decade have found that online treatment has equal efficacy to in person treatment. One study directly compared the effectiveness of the online CBT to in-person CBT and found that they were equally effective at reducing depression.10 In that study, those who stayed in therapy the longest saw the greatest benefit. It is not only CBT and the treatment of depression that works well online. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, which focuses on setting goals and finding solutions to problems, has also been tested online. In one study, researchers assigned students with mild to moderate levels of anxiety to receive either online or in-person therapy. Both methods were equally effective.11 Online therapy has also been studied regarding teletherapy’s success for PTSD and proved to be an effective method of treatment.12

To summarize, online therapy can bypass factors such as transportation, accessibility, and affordability. Remember that while a lot happens in sessions, most of the growth work is done out in the world while you are experimenting with and practicing the things you learned in treatment. Whether doing counselling in person or online, deciding to focus on your mental health and well being is always a worthwhile commitment.

 

How to access online counselling

If you think online treatment would suit your needs and lifestyle, consider EHN Online’s Mood (Depression) and Anxiety Intensive Outpatient Program. This online therapeutic program is for individuals struggling with mood or anxiety disorders such as (but not limited to) depression, anxiety or panic disorders and are looking to manage or alleviate their symptoms.

This online intensive outpatient program provides a supportive and structured treatment experience that allows patients to make meaningful changes to sustain long-term recoveries. You can expect to receive evidence-based therapy and support in a safe and non-judgemental space.

 

 

Still not sure which type of treatment is right for you?

Chat with an admissions counsellor or take our self-assessment quiz to learn more!

 

 

References

1 Canadian Community Health Survey – Mental Health (CCHS – MH), 2012. Percentage of the household population aged 12+ living in the 10 provinces that met criteria for at least one of six mental disorders (including mood disorders, generalized anxiety disorder, and substance use disorders).

2 Mental Health in Canada: Covid-19 and Beyond. (2020). CAMH Policy Advice. https://www.camh.ca/-/media/files/pdfs—public-policy-submissions/covid-and-mh-policy-paper-pdf.pdf

3 Understanding psychotherapy and how it works. (2020, July 31). Https://www.Apa.Org. https://www.apa.org/topics/psychotherapy/understanding

4 Depression and how psychotherapy and other treatments can help people recover. (n.d.). Https://Www.Apa.Org. Retrieved July 20, 2021, from https://www.apa.org/topics/depression/recover

5 What is Psychotherapy? (2019, January). American Psychiatric Association. https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/psychotherapy

6 Gillihan, S. (2018, February 7). How Do You Know When Your Depression Is Improving? Psychology Today Canada. https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/think-act-be/201802/how-do-you-know-when-your-depression-is-improving

7 Wagner, B., Horn, A. B., & Maercker, A. (2014). Internet-based versus face-to-face cognitive-behavioral intervention for depression: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial. Journal of Affective Disorders, 152–154, 113–121. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2013.06.032

8 Andrews, G., Basu, A., Cuijpers, P., Craske, M. G., McEvoy, P., English, C. L., & Newby, J. M. (2018). Computer therapy for the anxiety and depression disorders is effective, acceptable and practical health care: An updated meta-analysis. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 55, 70–78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2018.01.001

9 Stoll, J., Müller, J. A., & Trachsel, M. (2020). Ethical Issues in Online Psychotherapy: A Narrative Review. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 0. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00993

10 Carlbring P, Andersson G, Cuijpers P, Riper H, Hedman-Lagerlöf E. Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. 2018; 47(1):1-8.

11 Novella JK, Ng KM, Samuolis J. A comparison of online and in-person counseling outcomes using solution-focused brief therapy for college students with anxiety. Journal of American College Health. 2020:1-8.

12 Turgoose D, Ashwick R, Murphy D. Systematic review of lessons learned from delivering tele-therapy to veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare. 2018;24(9):575-85.

13 Novotney, A. (2017, February). A growing wave of online therapy. Https://www.Apa.Org. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/02/online-therapy

How to talk to and help someone with addiction

How to talk to and help someone with addiction

  Serious conversation between loved ones It is normal to be unsure of what to say and what to expect when talking to a loved one who is suffering from an addiction. Even if you are not comfortable talking about it, you should do so as soon as possible in order to help them. Problem use can trigger anxiety or depression, impair the proper functioning of organs such as the liver and kidneys, and can lead to serious and possibly fatal health problems. Fortunately, this disease can be effectively controlled with your support and evidence-based treatment tailored to the needs of the person suffering from addiction.

Does my loved one need my help with their substance use disorder?

How to know if someone is struggling with addiction

Your loved one may be exhibiting some worrisome behaviour, but how do you know whether they are experiencing a rough patch or a true addiction? Recognizing to increase their chances for recovery. In general, a person with a substance use disorder:

  • does not take care of themselves anymore;
  • has increased mood swings, is not their self on a daily basis;
  • has increased difficulty achieving daily tasks (ie at work or school);
  • is unable to control their consumption;
  • uses substances to help cope with difficult situations;
  • has increased the frequency and quantity of their substance consumption;
  • may lose consciousness and suffer amnesia as a result of the substance;
  • finds more pleasure in consuming than in being with friends or family.

There is no single cause of addiction; it is often the result of a combination of genetic and social factors. The individual may have a genetic predisposition or an underlying mental health disorder that triggers and fuels the cycle of addiction (called a concurrent disorder).  

Am I the right person to talk to my loved one about their addiction?

If you are the spouse, friend or family member or a person struggling with addiction, you’re likely the best person to start the discussion. Your loved one trusts you and knows that you care about their well-being. It’s normal to be worried or unsure of how to approach the subject. Here are some common mindsets that can set back the conversation:

I am afraid that they won’t talk to me anymore.
Understand that your loved one may be reluctant to have this conversation at first. In order to maintain your relationship, you should be clear that you are concerned for their wellbeing and want to help. By identifying yourself as an ally and following them on their steps to recovery, your relationship can become even stronger than it is now.

I am not a professional. I’m worried that I won’t say the right things.
Starting the conversation is definitely not an easy thing to do. You can’t predict your loved one’s reaction, but you can prepare yourself for the discussion. It’s all about the approach. Before you talk about it, make sure you understand addiction and have solutions to offer. Many people research potential groups, counsellors or programs that could be of use prior to starting the conversation.

How to prepare for a conversation about addiction

Educate yourself on addiction

Take the time to research and understand addiction, how it works, and why it happens. You don’t need to be an expert on the topic, but it is helpful to have a general understanding of their situation before beginning the conversation. This will help you to better understand and empathize with them so that you can have a more positive and open conversation. Below are some important things to know before approaching the subject.

How can an addicted person not realize that they are addicted?
While their addiction may seem obvious to you, it is more difficult for the person experiencing it to identify what is happening. Addiction begins in the unawareness stage. This is when the person consumes a substance in increasing frequency and quantities, but do not find this situation abnormal. They do not try to solve their problem because they do not recognize it. After a major event (such as an arrest, missing an important meeting, or letting down a loved one), an addicted person may enter into the awareness stage. However, this does not mean that they will always seek help. The misconception and stigma surrounding addiction often discourages people from seeking help.

Addiction is a disease, not a choice.
The World Health Organization identifies addiction as a disease in which an individual regularly experiences a strong or compulsive desire to consume a psychoactive substance (drinks or drugs, including prescribed medication, that affect one’s mental processes such as perception or consciousness). This compulsion is a results of profound changes in the brain. As the American Society of Addiction Medicine explains: “Addiction is a chronic disease that affects the brain’s reward circuitry, motivation, memory, and other associated circuits. Dysfunction of these circuits results in characteristic biological, psychological, social, and mental manifestations [ … ] This condition results in the use of substances to provide relief [ … ] .

A diagnosis is required for proper recovery.
Addicted persons require professional help to control and recover from their disease. Without proper care, their condition may deteriorate rapidly. They may develop serious health problems such as psychosis, schizophrenia or central nervous system degeneration. Remember that addiction is a heterogeneous disease, meaning it is often caused by a combination of different genetic and social factors. Because of its varying elements, proper medical intervention is required.

Identify the severity of their symptoms

While you cannot diagnose your loved one’s severity without the help of a medical professional, it is helpful to consider this so that you can guide them towards the best possible treatment. A person with mild to moderate symptoms is usually able to carry out daily activities and responsibilities with some control over their substance use. Individuals experiencing severe symptoms of addiction will struggle to remember, address or carry out important tasks and will have little control over their urges to use. At EHN Online, a specialist will make an initial assessment over the phone to determine the level of severity and propose a treatment plan adapted to the person’s needs.

Find support for yourself

Living with or being around someone who has a substance use disorder can affect you greatly. You may feel overwhelmed and need support in order to best help your loved one. Designated loved one support groups such as Al-Anon can help you to talk through your experiences with people in similar situations to find comfort and solutions. If your loved one decides to seek help, check to see if their treatment program includes support or therapy for loved ones. EHN Online’s intensive outpatient programs recognize the importance of family programming to not only support the person undergoing treatment, but to maintain the wellbeing of their loved ones.

Organize your approach

The way in which you choose to present your concerns and possible solutions is important. Don’t be afraid to write down your ideas and bring it with you for the discussion. Tell your loved one that you want to ensure you are able to communicate clearly and effectively so that you can help them. Being honest and transparent about this will encourage them to do the same.

Research certified addiction clinics.
Don’t walk into the conversation empty handed. Make sure you have prepared a list of possible solutions to the problem you are discussing so that you loved one understands that the purpose of the conversation is to help them. Research clinics to find out what treatments are available. Make sure you find treatment centres that are certified and offer quality, medically-based treatment. Certified clinics offer two types of treatment:

    • Outpatient treatment: for those with mild to moderate symptoms of addiction. EHN Online offers group therapy and individual meetings via video conference.
    • Inpatient treatment: for people with moderate to severe addiction symptoms. The person is accommodated in a center and supported at all times by professionals.

Choose the right time to talk about it.
There will never be a perfect moment to have this conversation, but some situations are better than others. Try to speak with them when they are not under the influence of a substance to promote a calm, rational and productive conversation. It may be helpful to plan this around a time when they may be coming down from a recent intoxication where they might feel guilt after excessive use. They may be more receptive, as they are experiencing the negative consequences of addiction. A person who is not experiencing the unpleasant effects of substance use will find it harder to accept that they have a problem. With that being said, try to focus on several concrete and frequent situations during your conversation rather than just one isolated event.

How to have an effective conversation with your loved one about their addiction

Not sure where to start? Talk about a change in behaviour. For example, you might point out that the person no longer participates in activities they previously enjoyed, doesn’t engage with friends, or their general demeanour has changed. Your examples should always be concrete, so try to think of very specific situations or reasons for your thinking. It is important to listen closely to their responses, and to demonstrate your concern for their well being. This will help them to see that the goal of the conversation is to help rather than accuse. Remember, you can always refer to the notes you prepared if you fear the conversation might derail.

Do’s and don’ts when addressing addiction

Make sure to:

  • find a private place so as not to be interrupted;
  • listen to what they have to say and address their emotions or concerns;
  • discuss the negative effects of their drinking on the most important people in their lives, such as their children or yourself;
  • remain calm at all times, even when addressing your concerns;
  • keep a positive and respectful tone;
  • show compassion and understanding to encourage an open conversation;
  • use your previous research to discuss potential solutions.

Try to avoid:

  • lecturing or criticizing them for their actions;
  • making judgements or jumping to conclusions;
  • using a confrontational approach which implies that they should feel guilty or ashamed;
  • making vague or debatable statements such as “You are always late when you drink”;
  • fuelling addictive behaviour (e.g. giving money that could be used to buy drugs or alcohol);
  • causing extreme distress, which could lead to increased substance use;
  • excusing their behaviour;
  • using ultimatums to force the person to stop using.

Remember that a person suffering from addiction relieves their negative emotions with substances. You don’t want your conversation to provoke such a situation.

Anticipating reactions to conversations about addiction

Reactions are difficult to predict, as each person is different. As a general rule, a person who is approached with the issue of addiction for the first time will likely have a strong and negative reaction, criticize you for discussing it, and deny their addiction. You should have realistic expectations about what might happen after the conversation. Be aware that your relationship may deteriorate temporarily and that you will not see an immediate change. Your loved one will require your ongoing help and support in order to stop using their substance. Stay on alert in the following days for any signs of increased use, as they may turn to their substance to cope with distress caused by this conversation. Rest assured that these reactions and situations are normal in this context. A person suffering from addiction does not want to face reality. They may feel ashamed and close themselves off to protect themselves. If you feel too much resistance, stop the conversation and offer to talk about it another time. You will have taken the first steps and the person will have time to reflect on your discussion. Make yourself available and attentive so that your loved one understands that they can talk to you at any time.

End on a positive note

Tell the person that you are there to support them at every stage of their journey. Explain that you will help them find a suitable treatment and accompany them throughout the healing process. Respect their choice if they are not ready to start right away and remind them that you will help them when they are. If possible, schedule a check-in for the near future to ensure that the topic is not brushed off and that your loved one doesn’t feel nagged when it comes up again.

Next Steps: How to help your loved one with their addiction

Finding the right substance use program

If your loved one agrees to accept help for their addiction, you can help them find the best treatment center for their needs. Make sure any centers you look into are certified and offer a relevant program. Some important questions to ask are:

  • Is there an initial medical assessment to provide your loved one with a personalized treatment plan?
  • Are there any subsequent assessments during treatment to ensure that they are still responding to the changing condition?
  • Is there any medical supervision?
  • Are the therapists accredited?
  • Is there aftercare? A family support program?
  • Are the practices evidence-based such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavioural therapy (DBT)?

Supporting a person in recovery

Following treatment, your loved one will have to reintegrate into their environment. The person in recovery needs to change certain aspects of their life to avoid relapse. Returning to an identical environment may provoke the same emotions or situations that initially triggered the cycle of addiction, so it is helpful to create a new routine with them.  You can do this by:

  • Helping them find new passions and activities to stay busy.
  • Offering to arrange your weekly schedules together to ensure you have time to attend each other’s support group meetings;
  • Making sure there is no alcohol or drugs in the house so as not to present any temptation.

Keep in mind that you do not have the power to cure a substance use disorder for your loved one. You can, however, support them through all the stages of recovery. Talk to your loved one as soon as possible before their condition has a serious impact on their health.

Call now or book a free and confidential consultation to learn more about EHN Online's Intensive Outpatient Programs for Substance Use Disorder.



Resources to help you:


Info-Social 811
811

ParentsLine
1-800-361-5085

Wellness Space Canada
1-888-417-2074

Al-Anon
Support group for relatives

5 signs you’re ready for an intensive outpatient program

5 signs you’re ready for an intensive outpatient program

Happy Lady on Laptop

When it comes to finding the right program for your recovery, it’s important to note that there are a variety of options available. While some programs don’t recognize things such as your previous experience in therapy, your demanding work schedule, or your commitments at home, an intensive outpatient program (IOP) does, and is a great option for someone looking to recover.

Intensive outpatient programs are full treatment programs that act as a great step up or down from where you currently are in your recovery. They are an accessible and affordable middle ground for people with mild-moderate symptoms of mental health or addiction who may not to to or be able to enter into a residential facility for treatment.

By determining whether an intensive outpatient program is right for you and your lifestyle, you are doing valuable research into the type of program that will benefit you the most. In this blog, we discuss some of the factors that can help you decide whether an IOP is the best choice for you. Keep in mind that not all the points listed below need to apply directly to you for an IOP to still be the right choice. Intensive outpatient programs fit into everyone’s recovery differently.

1. You recently finished inpatient treatment

Recovery is an ongoing process that doesn’t just end when you leave an inpatient program. Entering back into your everyday life presents its own set of challenges to tackle. IOPs offer a gradual step down from the work you have done in a residential facility so that you can maintain your growth with a steady support and education. Choosing an outpatient program that offers structure to your recovery will help you to better navigate the re-entry to your working and living environment and set you up for success in your long-term recovery. For those who have completed inpatient therapy and are asking themselves ‘what now?’ intensive outpatient programs are an excellent next step.

2. You can’t take time off from work or family

While inpatient treatments are an ideal environment for recovery, sometimes it is not feasible for you to enter into one when you are balancing work and family responsibilities. An IOP offers the flexibility you need to maintain your current duties, and the structure you need to meet your recovery goals.

While company assistance varies, there is an increased likelihood that employers will support employees in their rehabilitation process if they are able to continue working while they receive care. Many employers have policies in place to offer flexibility in these circumstances and it is always worth speaking with your boss to see if there is support available, whether it’s financial or otherwise.

Many IOPs can also be completed online, which removes more barriers for those who travel frequently or don’t have access to local outpatient services. Online IOPs allow for even more flexibility when trying to maintain the responsibilities of your daily life.

3. You have tried other methods of support but need more

If you have tried different methods of support such as medication, regular outpatient programs, inpatient treatment, counselling, or an app among others, but have found them to be ineffective on their own, an IOP is a great solution. By strategically bundling all the most effective elements of treatment together, IOPs can offer you a treatment plan that is cohesive and supportive. With individual counselling, group therapy, evidence-based techniques such as cognitive behavioural therapy, and an app to tie it all together, the components of intensive programs work together to ensure you have all the support you need. 

4. You need more structure and accountability

Recovery is an uphill battle. Without a set plan to prioritize your healing, it can become difficult to maintain your progress after completing a program. Recovery is a life-long fight that requires consistent attention and support. IOPs can offer the structure you need to support a stable recovery. By connecting you with the right technology, people, and resources, these programs can help you maintain accountability for your personal recovery goals and achieve success. An IOP can offer the support you need, while at the same time, providing the flexibility that you need to maintain your busy schedule.

5. You need more support from loved ones

Our loved ones can be huge factors in our progress and play an important role when it comes to your healing. Those close to us are often very willing to help but may not have the knowledge or understanding to do so. IOPs often include family education and therapy to provide your loved ones and those who support you with the tools they need to effectively support you along your recovery journey. This ensures there is mutual understanding across your entire support team, and that you are in alignment regarding the best course of action. What they learn is cohesive with what you learn!

Still not sure if an IOP is right for you? Take our self-assessment quiz!

If any of the reasons above resonate with you, then an IOP is a great plan to look into. EHN Online’s intensive outpatient programs offer the structure and support that you need to get on track and stay there! Beginning with eight weeks of intensive programming, participants will benefit from a combination of individual counselling, group therapy, family support, education about mental health and addiction, and access to our Wagon app to track progress and practice skills. With ten months of aftercare to follow, you can continue to track your progress on our app and learn from peers in weekly group therapy sessions. This network of assistance helps to ensure that you are never without support. Best of all, IOPs make recovery work with your busy schedule, no matter where you are!

 

EHN Online offers IOPs for substance use disorder, mood (depression) and anxiety, and workplace trauma. For more information about IOPs and if they are right for you, call us for a free and confidential consultation.

 

 

Online programs for substance use disorder – understanding your options for recovery

Online programs for substance use disorder – understanding your options for recovery

The decision to seek care for your alcohol or drug addiction is an important step towards recovery. By researching the differences in treatment options, you are already demonstrating self-awareness and initiative to make a change. Nonetheless, with so much information available online, the researching process can be intimidating. In this article, we will help you understand what online options are available so that you can make an informed decision about which course of action is the best for you.

One option when seeking online therapy is an intensive outpatient program (IOP).  This is an addiction or mental health treatment program designed for individuals who need more structure and intensive treatment than they can get from standard treatment options such as one-on-one therapy, medication, and support groups. IOP’s can either be in person or provided through an online therapy platform. 

Online therapy for mental health and addiction

Online therapy, also known as e-therapy, virtual therapy or teletherapy can be an effective treatment option for mental health and addiction support over the internet. This can occur via messaging, texts, video conferencing, or other digital solutions in real-time. This method can be beneficial to those struggling with mild to moderate addiction or mental health symptoms. It is important to note that online therapy can be very effective for many, but it is not a suitable replacement for inpatient programming if you are experiencing severe addiction symptoms.

Online therapy is an excellent solution if you live in a remote area, have limited access to quality substance addiction support or prefer to get help from the comfort of your own home. Programs that are strictly online typically have fewer operational costs and therefore can often offer more affordable treatment options. Online therapy is convenient and affordable – gone are the days of long commutes to therapy, missing work, or booking a babysitter to attend a session. 

How to have the best online therapy experience

Convenience is often reported as one of the greatest advantages of online therapy, however; this is contingent on the assumption that patients have access to a:

  • High speed internet connection
  • Laptop or tablet (preferable to a smartphone)
  • Private and comfortable space 
  • Solid support system or loved one to help maintain accountability throughout the program

Accessing online therapy for addiction

To begin the process of joining an online therapy program, decide which medium you prefer (text, video call, etc.) and conduct an online search. Find a place that resonates best with you and call or request an appointment. They may ask questions about your current mental state and demographic information to help match you with a compatible counsellor or program. Some additional factors to consider when choosing an online addictions program include: 

  • Therapist designation: If you want insurance to cover the cost of your therapy, make sure that the company has what you’re looking for. You will want to ask about if the therapists are Masters-level and registered, as most insurance companies have policies around this.
  • Schedules: Find out how flexible the individual and groups session schedules are to ensure they fit into your work and home life.
  • Evidence-based: Therapeutic approaches such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT) have been researched and proven to help patients develop meaningful and lasting change in their lives. Ask the admissions counsellor about which methods their programs use.
  • Price: Determine how much the sessions cost and what your budget can support. It is also important to consider what else the program offers in addition to the therapy (i.e. family support, aftercare, etc).

Pricing and payment methods for online therapy vary. Some platforms might use a subscription structure, billing you bi-weekly or monthly, and some might have you pay yearly or by session. It is important to keep in mind which method works best for you when selecting a platform. Prices for online therapy typically reside between $60-100 per session, which is a nice contrast to the $150-240 average for an in-person therapy session.

Figuring out which program is right for you

Substance use disorders are classified as mild, moderate and severe. Use the following criteria to help understand where your symptoms stand. If you agree with 2-4 of the following statements, you likely have mild symptoms. If you agree with 4-6 of the following statements you might fall under the moderate category, and 7+ means you are likely experiencing severe symptoms of substance use disorder. Speak to a healthcare professional for a formal diagnosis.

  • Your substance use has created dangerous situations for yourself or others.
  • Your substance use has caused relationship problems or conflicts with others.
  • You frequently fail to meet your responsibilities at work or home.
  • When you stop using the substance, you experience withdrawal symptoms.
  • You have built a tolerance and have increased your use amount and frequency.
  • You’ve tried to cut back or quit entirely, but haven’t been successful.
  • You spend a lot of your time using the substance.
  • Your substance use has led to physical or mental health problems, such as liver damage or anxiety.
  • You have skipped activities or stopped doing activities you once enjoyed in order to use the substance.
  • You experience cravings for the substance.

Take our short assessment quiz to find out if online rehab is a viable option for your recovery.

 

Types of online therapy for addiction 

There is a wide variety of online therapy solutions. To determine which option may be best for you given the severity of your symptoms, see the checklist above. 

  • Individual counselling – One on one counselling with a therapist via secure video platform. Most effective for mild symptoms.
  • Self-help groups – AA or SMART Recovery groups via secure video platform. Most effective for mild symptoms.
  • Mental health and wellness apps – Websites/self-led apps dedicated to mental health and wellness. Most effective for mild symptoms.
  • Group counselling – Therapeutic support with peers led by a therapist via secure video platform. Most effective for mild/moderate symptoms.
  • Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) – Intensive online treatment via secure platform. Most effective for mild/moderate symptoms. 

For those experiencing severe symptoms of addiction, inpatient therapy with medically assisted detox treatment might be a more suitable action plan for you.

How can an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) help you recover from addiction?

Have you tried individual counselling or self-help groups but feel you need more help? IOPs provide a more structured and intensive solution as they combine individual counselling, group counselling, family support and an app into one bundled package. Both intensive and flexible, IOPs are effective for those who are unable to take time away from family or work, but require more structure in their treatment process. 

IOP patients can maintain their daily routines and access therapy outside of work hours. Some of the most notable benefits for substance use disorder IOPs are:

  • Flexible scheduling to prevent interference with family and work time
  • Receive support and connection from others in a safe and non-judgemental space
  • Manage progress and prevent relapse with a structured aftercare program
  • Involve loved ones in your recovery for additional long term support
  • Receive immediate support with rolling intake and support on demand
  • Stay on top of your own recovery with progress tracking
  • Complimentary to AA and SMART Recovery
  • Evidence-based and use curriculum that is proven to work
  • Compatible with an easy-to-use online platform and app 

The IOP at EHN Online is eight weeks of intensive treatment, for nine hours a week, featuring both individual and group therapy. Studies show that group therapy plays an important role on the route to recovery as it creates a close-knit support network to give and receive information from peers with similar experiences, and provides an opportunity for increased self-awareness.[1] [2]

For ten months following treatment, patients participate in aftercare, with one virtual group meeting per week and access to the outpatient app, Wagon. This will allow you to track daily progress, achieve your goals, and better communicate with your counsellor. EHN Online’s in-house clinical team ensures full cohesion across the network, so your designated counsellor can join you throughout your entire journey to recovery. 

Accessing an Intensive Outpatient Program

To begin your journey with an EHN Online Intensive Outpatient Program, book an assessment with one of our IOP counsellors. You’ll discuss your symptoms, your history, and your goals for the future before you agree on a program that’s right for you. If you decide to go ahead, your counsellor will register you in that program during your appointment.

Many employee benefit plans cover treatment programs for alcohol and drug addiction. Contact EHN Online with the name of your employer and insurance provider so we can help determine your coverage and financing solutions.

Other IOP streams

EHN Online offers a variety of Intensive Outpatient Programs to help individuals reach their recovery goals:

How much does an IOP for addiction cost?

When it comes to cost, you need to take into account the chance of future intensive program needs. If your initial treatment does not have lasting positive effects and you need to re-enter a program, your total cost of rehabilitation will increase dramatically. It is more cost-effective to select a program that you feel will best address your needs, immerse you with a supportive group of peers, and keep you on track the first time around.

While your mental and physical health doesn’t have a price tag, you do have to consider what type of support can fit into your budget. Because of the bundled nature of IOPs, the hourly cost is actually far lower than a stand-alone individual therapy session or group. Here’s a simple cost breakdown: 

$38/hour for 173 hours over one year:

  • 9 hours of individual/group therapy sessions for 8 weeks
  • 12 available hours of family programming
  • 10 months of weekly aftercare 
  • Access to a digital app for corresponding materials and progress reports 
  • A detailed discharge meeting and summary 

Compared to traditional prices for individual and group therapy at about $60-100 per hourly session, an Intensive Outpatient Program provides a bundled offering for proven results and affordable prices. 

There is no single method of recovery that is the right solution for everyone. Individuals will thrive when they find a mixture of therapies, education, and lifestyle changes that works for them. A great place to begin is to use the severity classification method listed above to identify whether or not you would benefit from separation from your current surroundings and habits.

Congratulations on taking the first step towards recovery! Beginning the process is the most daunting part, and your initiative shows your willingness to make a change in your life. Whichever course of treatment you choose, recovery is around the corner!

Speak to a professional today to find out if an Intensive Outpatient Program is right for you.

 

All of the information on this page has been reviewed and verified by a certified addiction professional.

[1] Fogger, S. A., & Lehmann, K. (2017). Recovery Beyond Buprenorphine: Nurse-Led Group Therapy. Journal of addictions nursing, 28(3), 152–156. https://doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000180

[2] Epstein, E. E., McCrady, B. S., Hallgren, K. A., Gaba, A., Cook, S., Jensen, N., Hildebrandt, T., Holzhauer, C. G., & Litt, M. D. (2018). Individual versus group female-specific cognitive behavior therapy for alcohol use disorder. Journal of substance abuse treatment, 88, 27–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2018.02.003

[3] Inpatient vs. outpatient treatment: Recovery options. (2020, September 18). https://www.addictioncenter.com/treatment/inpatient-outpatient-rehab/

[4] Inpatient vs. Outpatient: Comparing Two Types of Patient Care. St. George’s University. (2019, June 18). https://www.sgu.edu/blog/medical/inpatient-versus-outpatient/.

How the right program can help prevent relapse after rehab

Man-at-top-of-staircase-recovery

How the right program can help prevent relapse after rehab

Recovering from a substance use addiction is an ongoing process that doesn’t end after attending rehabilitation. Maintaining abstinence from substances takes time, patience, resilience, and support. That’s why it is important that your rehabilitation program offers effective skills to prevent relapse, and a realistic duration of support upon program completion. 

Many people are under the misconception that one rehabilitation program will provide an end-all  solution. In reality, rehab only scratches the surface, helping patients to stabilize, collect their bearings, and develop further awareness about their addiction. It is the continuing care following rehabilitation that produces long-term results for recovery. By following through with your program’s aftercare, or enrolling in a step-down program, you can help reduce the likelihood of relapsing. 

Why does relapse occur?

A number of factors can contribute to relapse, despite completing a program for recovery. Returning to a familiar environment or social setting in which you once used a substance can trigger memories and urges to use again. This can trigger the relapse cycle, which leads to recurring substance use;

  • Stage 1: Emotional. This is where you are triggered by your environment or situation to crave substance use.
  • Stage 2: Psychological. This is where you bargain with yourself to believe that using the substance again will not lead to a relapse in your addiction. 
  • Stage 3: Physical. Once you have made peace with the idea of using again, the physical act of using drugs or alcohol becomes much easier. The euphoria that you feel from reuniting with the substance then makes it difficult for this act to be a one time occurrence.[2]

Relapse is not uncommon, in fact, research shows that the relapse rate for substance use disorder is 40-60%. This likelihood is similar to that of other chronic disorders and diseases such as asthma and type 1 diabetes. These relapses should all be recognized under the same chronic disorder umbrella, serving as a sign for resumed, modified, or new treatment. [1]

Relapse is so common that it is a frequently cited reason for seeking addiction recovery in the first place. Most individuals who seek help for substance use have already attempted to abstain on their own and are seeking a more permanent solution for recovery [2]. Understanding that you need a more structured approach to recovery means that you are prepared to find a lasting solution.

How to avoid relapse

The purpose of planning ahead for relapse prevention is to identify early warning signs and develop effective coping skills to catch relapse in its earliest stages. Addressing relapse and using a prevention plan as soon as you begin to recognize warning signs has shown to significantly reduce your risk of relapsing. [2] There are many things to keep in mind when striving to prevent relapse.

  • Avoid triggers such people or places connected to your substance use, situations which cause extreme stress, or situations in which you may witness substance use
  • Ensure that you have a positive support network, or an emergency contact person for difficult or triggering situations
  • Create a clear relapse-prevention plan and set measures to ensure accountability (such as recording progress and triggers, or checking in with a counsellor or group) 
  • Continue therapy or enrol in a program with an aftercare solution

Maintaining accountability and self-awareness plays an important role in relapse prevention. The goal of recovery programs is to set patients up for success for life, as opposed to short-term success. When seeking recovery support, consider programs that offer relapse-specific education and aftercare so that you are prepared to continue down the path of recovery.

 

How Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) support relapse-prevention

EHN Online’s IOP for Substance Use Disorder provides patients with the tools they need to prevent future relapse. Beginning with eight weeks of intensive therapy, patients will virtually attend both group therapy and individual therapy each week. 

Group therapy plays an important role in continued recovery by creating an intimate support network. This allows participants to provide information and support to peers with similar experiences, while meeting one-on-one with a therapist creates an opportunity to build a personalized recovery plan and focus on their own journey.

By accessing an intensive program that does not require inpatient admission, IOP participants can learn and use relapse prevention strategies in real time. Working recovery into your ongoing life and schedule helps to eliminate the shock of returning to life outside of rehabilitation upon program completion. 

Following the eight weeks of intensive therapy, the program offers ten months of aftercare support. This includes access to the Wagon app and one hour of group therapy per week. Because humans are social creatures by nature, formal therapy groups are proven to be effective in recovery as a source of persuasion, stabilization, and support. This creates an opportunity for healthy relationships, positive peer reinforcement, and way to develop new social skills. The rewarding nature of group therapy can at times produce even more positive benefits than individual therapy [3] [4]. Accessing a combination of group and individual therapy lets participants reap the benefits of both methods.

Staying on top of your recovery

Because addiction is a life-long fight, it is helpful for people in recovery to enrol in an IOP as a way to refresh their knowledge. If you have attended a form of rehabilitation in the past but fear relapse or would benefit from intensive aftercare support, an IOP is a great step-down solution. Participants in the IOP for Substance Use Disorder can re-immerse themselves in recovery education, make adjustments to their recovery plan, and stay connected to a network of support. 

Recovery from a substance use disorder is an ongoing process, and completing a treatment program is only the first step towards healing. The journey to sobriety takes time, patience and support. Enrolling in the right program is the first step towards getting and staying sober.

We can help you or your loved one get on the right path to recovery.
Call us for a free and confidential consultation.

 

Not sure if this program matches where you are in your own journey to recovery? We’ve got you covered. Check out these group therapy options. 

Socialization and Stabilization Group Therapy

Eight week group designed to support individuals, regardless of their position on the recovery continuum. Suitable for those at the precontemplation stage, who are resistant to “formal” programming, or are looking for a starting point to explore available recovery options. Read more.

Relapse Prevention Group Therapy

Eight week group primarily for those who have undergone treatment before. Individuals will be introduced to practical skills, create their own high risk prevention plan, develop a personal commitment statement and participate in exercises that will empower them to live a life without alcohol, drugs and/or other unhealthy behaviours. Read more.

 

[1] NIDA. (2020). Treatment and Recovery. Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/treatment-recovery

[2] Melemis S. M. (2015). Relapse Prevention and the Five Rules of Recovery. The Yale journal of biology and medicine, 88(3), 325–332.

[3] Scheidlinger S. (2000). The Group Psychotherapy Movement at the Millennium: Some Historical Perspectives. International Journal of Group Psychotherapy, 50(3), 315-339, DOI: 10.1080/00207284.2000.11491012

[4] McRoberts, Chris et al. (1998). Comparative Efficacy of Individual and Group Psychotherapy: A Meta-Analytic Perspective. Group Dynamics Theory Research and Practice 2(2):101-117, DOI:10.1037/1089-2699.2.2.101

 

 

3 simple steps to support your company’s mental health initiatives

3 simple steps to support your company’s mental health initiatives

The overall health and success of a workplace relies on both the physical and psychological well-being of its employees. By supporting a healthy and informed environment at work, organizations can set themselves up for success. According to the World Health Organization, the estimated cost to the global economy as a result of anxiety and depression in the workforce is US$ 1 trillion per year in lost productivity. Organizations can play a strong and effective role in promoting positive mental health in the workplace, “for every $1 put into scaled up treatment for common mental disorders, there is a return of $4 in improved health and productivity.” [1]

Providing mental health services to employees results in increased productivity and retention, and a decrease in healthcare costs. But with a wide variety of mental health services becoming more available to the public, how can you determine which solution will be the most effective for your employees and your business? 

Supporting mental health in the workplace – the bottom line

EHN Online has created intensive virtual programs for individuals struggling with mental health and/or addictions. The virtual and flexible nature of the programs allows for patients to continue to work while they access treatment that is intensive enough to create lasting results. With high completion rates and a clear return on investment, intensive outpatient programs can help reduce common costs such as absenteeism and turnover. [2]

 

Circle graphic - 500,000

Canadian workers miss work every week as a result of poor mental health [2]

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On average, leaves due to mental illness are roughly double the cost of leaves due to physical illness [3]

Average return on investment in company mental health initiatives after three years [2]

Completion rate for EHN Online’s Intensive Outpatient Program

By setting your employees up for success with their mental health, they will thrive personally and professionally. After all, a company is only as healthy as its employees. 

3 steps to supporting mental health and addiction at work

An important component to an organizational mental health strategy is offering readily available external therapy and rehabilitation to employees. By identifying a need within your company, and determining the best solution for recovery, you can set up your employees and company for success. It is important to recognize that mental health does not come with a one-size-fits-all formula. The best way to ensure that your employees are accessing the necessary resources to improve their mental health is to identify where their needs lie, and how to best address them. 

Step 1: Recognize your employee’s struggles and needs

Do you know how to recognize the signs that your employee’s mental health symptoms are increasing? Mental health resides on a spectrum, and identifying where an employee (or an aggregate of employees) stand is a great first step to knowing how you can best help them. Start by looking at the following chart to consider the types of symptoms, the severity and the frequency in which these may be displayed at work.   

 

Mild Symptoms Moderate Symptoms Severe Symptoms
Function Functioning at work Developed functioning at work and outside of work; absenteeism; presenteeism; increased sick days Low functioning at work or not working
Intensity Mental health symptoms triggered by an event or a situation (work stress, death, divorce, etc.) More frequent and intense mental health episodes Chronic mental health conditions
Use of Services Accessing support services for the first time or again after a break Has accessed or is accessing individual counsellor or digital solutions, but requires more intense and/or more frequent treatment Has accessed intensive mental health support and requires a day program or residential care

 

Step 2: Know your options for offering mental health support

Now that we understand that mental health is a spectrum, it is clear that different approaches need to be taken to experience optimal results for each severity classification. The chart below is a non-exhaustive list of potential solutions that best suit different severities.  

 

Mild symptoms Moderate Symptoms Severe Symptoms
Service options
  • Individual Counselling
  • iCBT
  • Self guided therapy 
  • Wellness apps
  • Peer support groups 
Combination individual and group therapy program with corresponding digital component (Intensive Outpatient Programs)
  • Partial Hospitalization program 
  • Residential treatment 

 

Step 3: Identify the most effective treatment 

Making the right choice for treatment can significantly affect your ROI. If your offering matches the needs of your company, you will see more success from treatments and increased productivity at work. Intensive Outpatient Programs at EHN Online allows employees to get treatment that fits into their home and work lives. 

By offering a combination of individual and group therapy with evening and daytime options, an IOP can:

  • reduce the cost of treatment 
  • improve outcomes
  • achieve higher completion rates and; 
  • help patients maintain long term progress. 

What is Intensive Outpatient Therapy?

Intensive outpatient programs (IOPs) at EHN Online are eight weeks of intensive treatment, four times a week, with both individual and group therapy. For ten months following treatment, patients participate in aftercare, with one virtual group meeting per week and access to the outpatient app, Wagon. This allows patients to track daily progress, achieve their goals, and better communicate with their counsellor. Our in-house clinical team ensures full cohesion across the network, so designated counsellors can join their patients throughout their entire journey to recovery. For corporate and healthcare referrals, our client care specialist is dedicated to ensuring that all reporting requirements are met and open communication exists.

Virtual and intensive therapy offers more structure than individual therapy or wellness apps, and more flexibility than in-person rehabilitation. This allows employees to immediately practice and be held accountable for using the skills learned in therapy to cope and stay at work while they heal. With specialized streams for a variety of disorders, family workshops, a corresponding app with clinically integrated content, and access to registered mental health professionals who are trained in effective online therapy, EHN Online’s IOPs are a high-ROI approach to achieving company workplace health goals. 

Finding success with IOPs

EHN Online’s IOPs for mental health, addiction and workplace trauma are accessible solutions with proven results. Referring an employee to an IOP can help you to continue supporting both your employees and your business.

“We’ve appreciated the high quality of service and the skilfulness of the clinicians to manage complex clients struggling with addictions and mood and anxiety disorders.” – Public mental health service provider

“Bob (EHN Online clinician) supported our client who has struggled in the past to connect with and get treatment from various other providers.” – Law enforcement partner

“EHN has been responsive to our requests to create a treatment schedule that best suits our clients.” – Insurance provider partner

Getting started 

Taking the time to research and understand your options for providing comprehensive mental health solutions to your staff demonstrates that you value your employees and want to see them thrive alongside your business.

Edgewood Health Network and EHN Online are dedicated to ensuring that every patient has access to a personalized recovery process, a therapeutic community, and ongoing treatment to prevent relapse. Call our referral relations team to learn more about our Intensive Outpatient Programs and how we can help you. 

We can help your employees get on the right path to recovery.
Contact us to learn more.

 

 

[1] World Health Organization. (n.d.). Mental health in the workplace. https://www.who.int/teams/mental-health-and-substance-use/mental-health-in-the-workplace

[2] Deloitte Insights. (2019). The ROI in workplace mental health programs: Good for people, good for business. Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited. https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/ca/Documents/about-deloitte/ca-en-about-blueprint-for-workplace-mental-health-final-aoda.pdf

[3] Dewa, Chau, and Dermer (2010). Examining the comparative incidence and costs of physical and mental health-related disabilities in an employed population. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 52: 758-62. Number of disability cases calculated using Statistics Canada employment data, retrieved from http://www40.statcan.ca/l01/cst01/labor21a-eng.htm.

Online Therapy and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs)- Find the best online recovery solution for your mental health

Online Therapy and Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs)- Find the best online recovery solution for your mental health

Technology has enhanced how individuals can get mental health support, especially throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet with so many options for recovery, it can be overwhelming finding a solution that’s best for you. Identifying your symptoms and how severe they are will help narrow your search and find a virtual therapy solution to help you thrive!

What is online therapy?

Online therapy, also known as virtual therapy, teletherapy or e-therapy provides internet-based mental health support via secure web platforms. Users can communicate with mental health professionals in real time via messaging, video, or phone. For those who live in remote areas, have busy schedules, childcare responsibilities, or limited access to quality in-person support, online therapy is an accessible solution for mental health needs.

Which type of therapy is best for me?

It is important to understand the severity of your symptoms in order to find the best mental health support for you. Think back to the last seven days and answer the questions below. How frequently did the listed symptoms occur?

For each question, give yourself a score of 0-4, with 0 being “I have not experienced this symptom at all” and 4 being “I experienced this symptom non-stop.”

Questionnaire #1: Depression

Reminder: answer each question on a scale of 0-4 (0 means you did not experience this, and 4 means you experience it constantly).

In the past seven days, I…

  • Found little interest or pleasure in doing things
  • Felt down, depressed, or hopeless 
  • Had trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much
  • Felt tired or had little energy 
  • Had a poor appetite or over-ate 
  • Felt bad about myself – that I am a failure or have let myself or my family down 
  • Had trouble concentrating on things, such as reading, working or watching television 
  • Moved or spoke so slowly that other people could have noticed? Or the opposite—was noticeably fidgety or restless
  • Thought that I would be better off dead, or of hurting myself in some way

Add up your score and divide it by nine to find your average. View the severity chart below to identify where your symptoms land.

Questionnaire #2: Anxiety

Reminder: answer each question on a scale of 0-4 (0 means you did not experience this, and 4 means you experience it constantly).

In the past seven days, I…

  • Felt moments of sudden terror, fear, or fright 
  • Felt anxious, worried, or nervous 
  • Had thoughts of bad things happening, such as family tragedy, ill health, job loss, or accidents
  • Felt a racing heart, sweaty, trouble breathing, faint, or shaky 
  • Felt tense muscles, was on edge or restless, or had trouble relaxing or sleeping
  • Avoided situations about which I worry
  • Left situations early or participated only minimally due to worries
  • Spent lots of time making decisions, putting off making decisions, or preparing for situations, due to worries
  • Sought reassurance from others due to worries 
  • Needed help to cope with anxiety (e.g. alcohol or medication, superstitious objects, or other people)

Add up your score and divide it by ten to find your average. View the severity chart below to identify where your symptoms land.

Severity Chart

Once you have added your scores together and divided them by the number of questions you answered, you should have a number between 0 and 4. Find your place on the chart for a general estimation of your symptom severity.

Average Score 0 1 2 3 4
Symptom Severity None Mild Moderate Severe Extreme

Keep in mind that the results of this exercise are not conclusive, but are a great starting place for understanding your mental health. Speaking to a doctor or counsellor for a professional opinion will offer more concrete answers.

Use our self-assessment tool to better understand the severity of your symptoms and which therapy solution may be best for you.

Types of online therapy

Online therapy exists in many forms. This method can be beneficial to those struggling with mild to moderate mental health symptoms. In order to participate in online therapy, patients will require access to technology such as webcams, laptops and a reliable WiFi connection. Online therapy, especially groups, are most effective when using a tablet or laptop, not a smart phone.

Most effective for mild symptoms or immediate relief

  • Individual counselling – One on one counselling with a therapist via secure video platform.
  • Individual text or telephone counselling – One on one counselling with a therapist via your phone, with more opportunity for immediate support.
  • Self-help groups – Meet virtually with peers who have had similar experiences and offer each other support.
  • Mental health and wellness apps – Access mental health and wellness resources to improve your mind and mood.

Most effective for moderate symptoms

  • Group counselling – Therapeutic support with peers led by a licensed therapist via secure video platform.
  • Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) – Intensive online treatment on a secure platform with a combination of individual and group therapy. EHN Online’s IOP also includes access to our Wagon app.

Most effective for severe and extreme symptoms

  • If you’re experiencing severe mental health symptoms, you may benefit from an intensive outpatient program or a residential treatment stay. Following inpatient treatment, many patients benefit from maintaining their recovery with solutions appropriate for moderate symptoms, such as group counselling or intensive outpatient programs.

How to know if an intensive outpatient program is right for you

EHN Online offers a virtual IOP for those who are experiencing moderate mental health symptoms. A flexible and affordable solution, IOPs allow patients to work around their personal and work schedules, but still maintain a level of intensity that supports accountability in your recovery. Visit our mood and anxiety page to learn more about intensive outpatient therapy, or book an assessment with one of our counsellors.

Some of the most notable benefits for mood and anxiety IOPs are:

  • Skills-based sessions for immediate results
  • Minimal disruption to work and family
  • Affordable option as compared to individual counselling alone
  • Convenient
  • Evidence-based therapy with proven results
  • Compatible with an easy-to-use online platform and app

The IOP at EHN Online is eight weeks of intensive treatment, four times a week, featuring both individual and group therapy. Studies show that group therapy plays an important role in recovery by creating an intimate support network for sharing information and support with peers who have similar experiences.[1] [2]

Following the intensive treatment, patients participate in ten months of aftercare for two hours/week. These groups are offered online and include use of the Wagon app, which allows you to track daily progress, achieve your goals, and better communicate with your designated counsellor.

Just as mental health isn’t uniformly experienced by everybody, no method of recovery is equally beneficial to all. Reflect upon your symptoms and try to determine which solutions will provide the most value to you. Understanding your severity is a great place to start, so you are already on the right track!


Speak to a professional today to determine which course for recovery is best for you.  Call us at 888-767-3711 to start the process.

All of the information on this page has been reviewed and verified by a certified mental health professional.

[1] Fogger, S. A., & Lehmann, K. (2017). Recovery Beyond Buprenorphine: Nurse-Led Group Therapy. Journal of addictions nursing, 28(3), 152–156. https://doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000180

[2] Epstein, E. E., McCrady, B. S., Hallgren, K. A., Gaba, A., Cook, S., Jensen, N., Hildebrandt, T., Holzhauer, C. G., & Litt, M. D. (2018). Individual versus group female-specific cognitive behavior therapy for alcohol use disorder. Journal of substance abuse treatment, 88, 27–43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2018.02.003